Monthly Archives: June 2015

>> CHÎLÐ ØF WÏLÐ x SÛRFLÏNÊ <<

June 30, 2015

Δ Surfline just launched their new swim editorial “Shifting Sands” featuring our jewels!!       Starring mega babes Bryana Holly, Alden Steimle and Lelia Thomas. ∇

ψ The desert, like the ocean, is a realm of isolation. A wild, enchanting landscape spanning beyond the boundaries of sight and sound. Shaped by the absence of water, winds surge through the vast open sea of rock and sand, unimpeded by the constructs of man. There’s a strange tranquility in this isolation, a sense of belonging amidst the void. The desert winds humming a soft, ceaseless melody heard only by shifting sands. ψ

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 Check of the full feature   >>>  http://shiftingsands.surfline.com/
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⋅STØRŸ OF THÈ SQÛÄSH BLÖSŠOM⋅

June 24, 2015

¤ Squash blossom necklaces are one of our most unique items here at Child of Wild. Their rustic feel and hand made design make them a one of a kind accessory to intensify any outfit. Not only are squash blossom necklaces intriguing to look at, their symbolism reaches as far back as the Paleolithic period. Take a journey with us as we trace the roots of the beautiful squash blossom. ¤

SQUASH BLOSSOM

SQUASH BLOSSOM

¤ The two main components of the squash blossom necklace are the inverted crescent pendant that hangs centrally and the flower beads that symmetrically frame it on either side. ¤

SQUASH BLOSSOM

¤ The upside down crescent ~ referred to by the Navajo as the naja ~ is a common symbol circulated by many world cultures. Universally, the inverted crescent is a symbol worn to ward off bad luck or the ‘evil eye.’ Originally used by the Moors in the Middle Ages, this emblem ornamented horse bridles to ensure the horse and its rider a safe journey or successful conquest. ¤

SQUASH BLOSSOM

¤ The Spanish and Portuguese adopted this custom upon witnessing its use by the Moors and brought it with them when they traveled to South and Central America. The trend soon caught on in Mexico and then reached the neighboring Navajo. ¤

SQUASH BLOSSOM

¤ The Navajo squash blossom necklace is the most widely recognized form of the inverted crescent in today’s society. However, the naja, traditionally thought of as a repellant of bad energy, holds a very different meaning for the Navajo. ¤

SQUASH BLOSSOM

¤ In Native American culture, the squash blossom necklace is a highly esteemed symbol that marks their transition from a raiding society to a mercantile one. Within the tribe, prestige was once earned through ransacking and pillaging, however since the manufacturing of squash blossom accessories, a man or woman could instead pride themselves upon their craftsmanship and silverwork. ¤

SQUASH BLOSSOM

SQUASH BLOSSOM

¤ Around the 1800s, floral beads were added to squash blossom necklaces. The squash blossom necklace receives its name from these beads; however, the name is a misnomer. The floral shape actually resembles the Spanish-Mexican pomegranate blossom, not the squash blossom. The pomegranate blossom is the symbol of Granada, Spain so it is likely the Navajo received these beads from the Spanish and their name was mistranslated during the transaction. The first beads were made purely of silver, but over time they became more and more elaborate with the addition of turquoise and other natural stones. ¤

SQUASH BLOSSOM

SQUASH BLOSSOM

Shop our squash blossoms!

SQUASH BLOSSOM

SQUASH BLOSSOM

SQUASH BLOSSOM

SQUASH BLOSSOM

SQUASH BLOSSOM

SQUASH BLOSSOM

CROSSING OVER

›› ÇRÖSŠING ØVËR ‹‹

June 16, 2015

‹♦ Christianity was introduced to most of the African continent during the late 19th century by European missionaries. Ethiopia, however, is one of the few countries that practiced Christianity well before European colonialism. In the 4th century, King Ezana of Ethiopia declared the state religion to be Orthodox Christianity and Ethiopian coptic crosses began to be produced. ♦›

CROSSING OVER

CROSSING OVER

‹♦ Ethiopian crosses are easily distinguishable from their beautiful baroque style lattice work. In general, elaborate geometric patterns are seen in Ethiopian art, so it’s not surprising this tradition was carried into their crosses. The overlapping designs are symbolic of an everlasting life and still hold that value in modern day. ♦›

CROSSING OVER

‹♦ Originally, crosses were cut out of bone, wood, leather, or stone. Starting in the 19th century, silver coins called birr became more regularly used and were melted down to create silver crosses. Different patterns and designs were incorporated depending on the region where the cross was made, and who the artisan was. Ethiopian Orthodox Christians began to wear their locally designed crosses as a statement of their faith and of their pride of their hometown. ♦›

CROSSING OVER

CROSSING OVER

CROSSING OVER

‹♦ Throw on an Ethiopian cross or beadwork to show off your faith or simply add some flair to your look! Shop these styles now: ♦›

CROSSING OVER

CROSSING OVER

CROSSING OVER

CROSSING OVER